New Channel 4 series “Inheritance Street” examines lives of work-shy spongers

As austerity continues to bite, jobs in the city remain hard to come by and inheritances are squeezed, this observational documentary series reveals the reality of life on inheritance, as the residents of one of Britain’s most inheritance-dependent streets invite cameras into their tight-knit community.

Channel 4’s ground-breaking new series takes an in depth look at some of the most marginalised in our modern society. While hundreds of thousands languish together on housing lists and in dole queues, it is increasingly lonely at the top of the pile with fewer and fewer people controlling more of the wealth. “I often feel there is no one in politics that represents my views,” says Annabelle Hetherington, a loathsome star of the show. “Well obviously my father is a Lord but I didn’t vote for him!”

The series follows several residents of ‘Inheritance Street’ as they navigate their way through life on the top rung of Britain’s economic ladder. Despite the challenges the residents face, the street (or the driveway as they refer to it) also has a strong sense of community. While the characters freely talk about private yachts and hunting trips they become very tight lipped when the issue of fraud is raised, demanding a lawyer be present before they would speak on the record.

According to some politicians and media coverage, inheritance is an easy route to a life of luxury, foreign holidays and lavish homes furnished with widescreen TVs – all at the expense of hard-working taxpayers though residents of Inheritance Street disagree. “I do feel guilty that I live off the proceeds of others but it’s not my fault; society made me that way,” says Annabelle’s brother Edward. “Everyone in my school was heading into the same life of inheritance so I never thought of trying to make something of myself.”

Inheritance street can be seen Mondays at 9 right before ‘Britain’s Sexiest Taxi Ranks’.

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